Summer 2019 Online Courses Catalog

SUMMER ONLINE SESSION 2019


*Tuskegee University  is offering online courses in multiple subjects for the Summer 2019 session. 

The summer online term offers you an opportunity to continue your education, persist toward graduation and learn valuable skills such as time management and goal setting. Courses are taught by Tuskegee University faculty and are offered to currently enrolled undergraduate students and non-degree students from around the globe. We invite students enrolled at other institutions to join us for the Summer 2019  session.

  1. Pre-Registration Begins April 23, 2019

  2. .To view the video on "How to search for DL courses" Click here https://youtu.be/XTcJZEi8SWk  

  3. To register for these sections, please log onto www.tuskegee.edu/tigerweb, and search for distance learning sections using the acronym DL in the "Section" box of the Search for Sections screen
     

*SUMMER 2019 ONLINE COURSES 
*Course list is subject to change. A minimum of 10 students must enroll per course in order for a course to be officially offered for the summer semester.

BUSN 0301 PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE 3 Credit hours 
This is an introductory course in corporate finance which aims to familiarize the students with the key concepts in the financial management including time value of money, risk and return, financial statement analysis, and asset valuation models. The central theme of the course is how to maximize the value of the firm.

BUSN 0302 INTERMEDIATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 3 Credit Hours This is the second course in corporate finance. The main topics to be covered in this course include working capital management, capital budgeting, capital structure and leverage, dividend policy, and mergers and acquisitions. Mini-cases and spreadsheets are used to help students to learn the financial decision-making process.
    
CHEM 0231. GENERAL CHEMISTRY I. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, Recitation 1, 4 credits. The principles of chemistry. Topics covered include: stoichiometry, atomic structure and periodic table, molecular structure, gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, oxidation and reduction, and properties of solids and liquids. The course is intended for science and engineering students who need a rigorous introductory course in chemistry as a prerequisite for advanced courses. Corequisites: CHEM 0233

CHEM 0232. GENERAL CHEMISTRY II. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer, Lect. 4, 4 credits. Topics studied include acids and bases, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium. The elements and their compounds are studied in terms of periodic relationships. Schemes for the detection and identification of the elements are used to illustrate descriptive chemistry and the principles of chemical equilibria. Prerequisite: CHEM 0231. Corequisite: CHEM 0234. 

CHEM 0320. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I. 1st Semester, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Nomenclature, physical properties and reactions of carbon compounds; reaction mechanisms; spectroscopy as an aid to the elucidation of molecular structures. Prerequisites: CHEM 0232 and 0234. Corequisite: CHEM 0322.

COMM 0222. INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION. An introduction to the nature and function of human communication, the forms of communication, and the development of the discipline of communication studies. Prerequisite: English 102.

COMM 0223. COMMUNICATION THEORY. A survey of theories examining the communication process and the nature and role of communication in human behavior. Prerequisite: Communication 222. 

COMM 418. COMMUNICATION RESEARCH. A major research project directed by a faculty member. Prerequisite: Communication 223.    

CSCI 0100. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Instruction and tutoring in basic computer skills, designed for students with little or no background in Computer Science. An overview of computer applications including word processors, spreadsheets, databases, and other popular software. This course includes hands-on experience with microcomputers. This course cannot be used as a CSCI/CSIT elective for CSCI majors. Prerequisites: None.

ENGL 0102. ENGLISH COMPOSITION II. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. A continuation of ENGL 0101 emphasizing persuasion, critical analysis of literature of various genres, library and Internet research techniques, and the research paper. Prerequisite: ENGL 0101.

ENGL 0203. PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WRITING. 2nd Semester, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. A one-semester writing course designed to enable students to acquire and to demonstrate proficiency in handling basic technical communications (including business correspondence) and various types of exposition (especially those pertinent to technical reports). Prerequisite: ENGL 0102.

ENGL 0204. CRITICAL READING AND TECHNICAL WRITING. 1st Semester. Lect. 3, 3 credits. This course is designed to help students develop and improve technical communication skills in critical reading and technical writing, especially as they apply to professional and technical contexts. The course emphasizes a reader-centered approach to interpreting and composing documents employing technical vocabulary. Prerequisite: ENGL 0102. 

ENGL 0209. BASIC NEWS REPORTING. Fundamentals of news reporting for newspapers, radio, and television. Prerequisite: English 102.

ENGL 0220. PRINCIPLES OF SPEECH. 2nd Semester. Lect. 3, 3 credits. An analysis of the basic principles of communication focusing on communicative processes involving the speaker, the situation, the message, the channel, and the receiver.

ENGL 0327. PUBLIC SPEAKING. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Preparation and delivery of speeches to audiences.

ENGL 0332. CREATIVE WRITING. (Offered in response to need and available faculty.) Lect. 1, Lab 2, 3 credits. A course open to students desiring guidance and practice in creative writing. Some attention is given to contemporary writing styles, particularly those of black writers. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ECON 0201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 1st and 2nd Semester and Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. The first part of this course sequence deals with the aggregate volume of the output of the American Economy, with the extent to which its resources are employed, with size of the national income, and with the "general price level." This course explores the economic behavior of aggregates on a national scale. Substantial time is spent analyzing aggregate employment, income, output, and inflation. Studying textbook style problems and techniques constitutes an integral part of the class. 

ECON 0202. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 1st and 2nd Semester and Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. This course is the second part of two sequence of principles of economics and deals with division of total output among competing uses. It considers problems of income distribution. Its interest is in relative prices of particular goods and services. This course explores the economic behavior of individuals and firms. The students will gain sufficient knowledge and technique to prepare them for advanced course work in economics, finance, management, supply chain management, and other business courses.

ECON 0300. INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICAL ANALYSIS. 1st Semester. Lect. 3, 3 credits. This course deals with the collection, presentation, and interpretation of data. It is concerned with the measures of location, measures of dispersion, probability and probability distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 0107.

FREN 0101. ELEMENTARY FRENCH I. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Essentials of novice-level French communication to include listening, reading, writing, and speaking; introduction to Francophone cultures.                                            

FRENCH 102ELEMENTARY FRENCH II. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Continuation of FREN 0101. Prerequisite: FREN 0101.

HIST 0103. WORLD CIVILIZATION. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. and Disc. 3, 3 credits each. A study of the origins and development of world civilizations. Particular emphasis is given to the interrelationship among the various civilizations and to the development of ideas and institutions most relevant to the modern world. History 0103 concludes about 1650 A.D. History 0104 covers the period from about 1650 A.D. to the present.

HIST 0104. WORLD CIVILIZATION. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. and Disc. 3, 3 credits each. A study of the origins and development of world civilizations. Particular emphasis is given to the interrelationship among the various civilizations and to the development of ideas and institutions most relevant to the modern world. History 0103 concludes about 1650 A.D. History 0104 covers the period from about 1650 A.D. to the present.

HIST 0105. THE BLACK EXPERIENCE IN AMERICAS. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Lecture and discussion , 3 credits. This course will provide an inquiry into the background and development of African Americans on the continent of North and South America. Emphasis will be placed on the black experience in slavery, there in the political, social and economic development of the United States, and social and cultural movements in the North and South America. Prerequisite for History Majors: HIST 0103 and HIST 104; Prerequisite for non-History Majors: HIST 103, a choice to select HIST 104 or HIST 105.

HIST 0210 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. 1st and 2nd Semesters respectively, Summer. (HIST 0210). 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer (HIST 0211only). Lect. and Disc. 3, 3 credits each. A study of social, political and economic developments in North America from the Age of Discovery to present times. History 0210 concludes with the end of Reconstruction, 1877 and History 0211 covers the period from 1877 to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 0101.

HIST 0211. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. 1st and 2nd Semesters respectively, Summer. (HIST 0210). 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer (HIST 0211only). Lect. and Disc. 3, 3 credits each. A study of social, political and economic developments in North America from the Age of Discovery to present times. History 0210 concludes with the end of Reconstruction, 1877 and History 0211 covers the period from 1877 to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 0101.

HIST 0316. AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY. 1st and 2nd Semesters respectively. Lect. and Disc. 3, 3 credits each semester. An inquiry into the background and development of AfroAmericans with emphasis upon their role in the political, social and economic development of the United States and an interpretation of selected major forces in the Black experience in the United States. History 0316 will analyze the period from the slave trade until 1877. History 0317 will cover the period from 1877 to the present. Prerequisite: Any six-hour combination of HIST 0103, 0104, 0210, 0211.

MATH 0107. COLLEGE ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY I. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 4, 4 credits. Sets; real numbers; absolute value; inequalities; relations and functions; polynomial functions, systems of linear equations. Prerequisite: Placement or minimum grade of “C” in MATH 0106.

MATH 0108. COLLEGE ALGEBRA & TRIGONOMETRY II. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 4, 4 credits. Circular functions; trigonometric functions; vectors in the plane; complex numbers; theory of equations; analytic geometry. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in MATH 107 or Departmental Approval.


MATH 207 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 4, 4 credits. Introduction to analytic geometry; functions; limits; derivatives and integrals with some applications. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of "C” in MATH 0108 or MATH 0110 or Departmental Approval. Students will not be allowed to use both MATH 0207 and MATH 0227 to fulfill degree requirements in any major.                                          
 MATH 0227. INTRODUCTORY CALCULUS. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 4, 4 credits. Primarily designed for students in Architecture and the Social Sciences. Emphasis is on application of elementary differentiation and integration. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in MATH 0107 or MATH 0110 or Departmental Approval. Students will not be allowed to use both MATH 0207 and MATH 0227 to fulfill degree requirements in any major. 

PHIL 0202. INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. The study of formal logic including both traditional (Aristotelian) and symbolic logic. The course considers the relation of logic to natural languages and to information sciences, and the general historical development of logic. The instruction emphasizes fundamentals of argument construction, proofs, and logical fallacies. An additional objective is to encourage students’ improvement in reasoning skills.

PHIL 0203. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS. 1st Semester, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. This course is an examination of the major ethical theories that have been developed throughout the history of Western philosophy. These theories are given a philosophical context. The course will concentrate on the relationship of traditional ethics to current ethical problems

PHYS 0301. ELEMENTARY GENERAL PHYSICS - I. 1 and 2 Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Basic concepts and theories of measurements, mechanics, properties of matter, heat, and thermodynamics with applications in biological sciences. The course is designed for students desiring more advanced algebra based physics course. To be taken in sequence with Phys. 0302. Prerequisite: MATH 0107, Co-requisite: PHYS 0303.

PHYS 0302. ELEMENTARY GENERAL PHYSICS - II. 1 st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Basic concepts, theories and applications of sound, optics, electricity, magnetism, elements of electronics (electrical circuits). Pre-requisite: PHYS 0301, Co-requisite: PHYS 0304.

PSYC 0272. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Human development from conception through late childhood. Emphasis is on general developmental characteristics and upon general determinants of the developmental process. 

PSYC 0377. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, Lab 1, 3 credits. An examination of the total life span, from conception through old age, and the developmental tasks encountered by humans.
 
SOCI 0240. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Introduction to the scientific study of social structures and social processes as they operate in American Society.

SOCI 0241. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 1st and 2nd Semesters, Summer. Lect. 3, 3 credits. A systematic analysis of social problems, using values in conflict as the major referent

SPAN 0101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Elementary Spanish grammar; graded reading; introduction to Hispanic culture.

SPAN 0102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, 3 credits. Continuation of SPAN 0101. Prerequisite: SPAN 0101.

SOWK 0356. SOCIAL WORK IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SETTINGS. 1st and 2nd Semesters. Lect. 3, 3 credits. This course seeks to introduce the student to the role of social work in Corrections. In an effort to give a thorough introduction, theories of crime causation, past and present, will be presented. Students will be expected to analyze these theories viewed with emphasis on the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs,                                

SOWK 0358 MENTAL HEALTH 3 Credit Hours The course is designed to give the student insight into the historical development of Mental Health services and present day delivery systems. The use of DSM 5 in professional practice is emphasized.        

SOWK 0456 GERONTOLOGY 3 Credit Hours This course aims to equip students with a framework and method of studying, assessing and understanding gerontology. The basic theoretical approach will be psychosocial in nature.

SOWK 0459. SOCIAL TREATMENT.  Offered in response to need and availability of faculty . Lect. 3, 3 credits. In-depth study of various theories and intervention techniques available to the modern social worker.

*Course list is subject to change. A minimum of 10 students must enroll per course in order for a course to be officially offered for the summer semester.

  • All online courses are semester-based and operate much like a typical Tuskegee University course, except delivery will be online.
  • Courses will be taught by Tuskegee University faculty and instructors.
  • Course(s) can be used toward Degree requirements (including Free Electives).
  • IMPORTANT: Ask your Academic Advisor to recommend Online course(s) that will count towards your Degree requirement before registering.  
  • Prerequisites must be satisfied. Ex. ENGL 101 (“C” or higher) is a prerequisite for ENGL 102; MATH 107 (“C” or higher) is a prerequisite for MATH 108
  • Maximum credits during Summer semester: Nine (9)
  • Tuition and fees will be posted via the Bursar's website and will include all Tuskegee University fees as applicable. Some mandatory fees will apply to these courses; please see the Bursar’s website at www.tuskegee.edu/onestop for detailed information.
  • Online summer courses taken at Tuskegee University are used in computing the GPA.

For more information, contact:

Mr. Richard Glaze, Online Enrollment Counselor
Office of Distance Education and Online Learning
John A. Kenney Hall, Rm 70-421C
1200 W. Montgomery Road
Tuskegee, AL 36088
Phone: 334-724-4704
Email: odeol@tuskegee.edu

http://tuskegee.blackboard.com